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The Blackangel

Accent?

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On 2/17/2022 at 7:06 AM, Empire said:

Born in Australia and with a British accent 😛

In fact, while living in Australia and going to school or college, I always had kids and people saying about me and how I speak and they say go back to the UK, they do not believe me that I never been to the UK 😛

How different is the British and Australian accent?  I can tell some difference.  Is the accent in Australia and New Zealand different?

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On 2/20/2022 at 6:47 PM, Jayson said:

How different is the British and Australian accent?

Lived in both countries for many years each and have kind of adopted a mixture of each accent (Even though I like to think my English accent is prevalent). I can say that there is a definite difference between the two as there are many different accents within England itself.

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5 hours ago, Empire said:

Lived in both countries for many years each and have kind of adopted a mixture of each accent (Even though I like to think my English accent is prevalent). I can say that there is a definite difference between the two as there are many different accents within England itself.

I met Daniel Logan a few years ago, and he's a Kiwi, but he speaks with an American accent. I don't know what the normal accent in New Zealand is, but his accent is American. I assume it's either the same or similar to Australian accents. He's Maori also. Maybe it's due to him being in the US and playing Boba Fett at a young age, but he sounds as American as I do.

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On 2/26/2022 at 7:33 AM, Empire said:

Lived in both countries for many years each and have kind of adopted a mixture of each accent (Even though I like to think my English accent is prevalent). I can say that there is a definite difference between the two as there are many different accents within England itself.

There's a difference. I can tell it.  Well, unfortunately, my only experience is Crocodile Dundee, mostly, lol.

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I have mixture of an African undertone with a South London accent (never been to London) but I adopted it as I grew up maybe.

But most people say I am more english in my speaking and way of life though.

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17 hours ago, Clasher said:

I have mixture of an African undertone with a South London accent (never been to London) but I adopted it as I grew up maybe.

But most people say I am more english in my speaking and way of life though.

I spent 6 months in London and took on the accent instinctively and normally I just speak proper english.

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I have a mostly "neutral" American accent, but since I grew up in the South, certain pronunciations of words and colloquialisms can have someone sniff out I'm from the South if they're knowledgable on stuff like that. Or it's because y'all is never leaving my vernacular.

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Oh dear, I knew I'd find the phrase "British accent" in here. Never fails to grind my gears. Oh well!

My accent is a mix of South and West Yorkshire, with something of a Birmingham ("Brummy")/Dudley twang (all three are English dialects). When my partner and I stayed a week in Birmingham, I started speaking more with that accent because I was born near that area and have parents who come from there. Even having lived in South and West Yorkshire all my life, my dialect changes ever so slightly depending on whereabouts I am.

I'll give an phonetic example of how Yorkshire and Brum sounds, to the sentence "The rain in spain falls mainly on the plane" from the film My Fair Lady:

Yorkshire: Thuh rairn en Spairn forls mairnly un t'plairn.

Birmingham: Tha royn in Spoin fouls moinly on tha ploin.

An example of both can be found in Hogs of War, by comedian Rik Mayall, may he rest in peace. You'll hear the Yorkshire accent first with the character Nobby, and then the Brum accent with Ginger (Mayall also played the character Kevin Turvey, an investigative journalist with a Birmingham accent).

Edited by Withywarlock
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On 7/29/2022 at 8:22 PM, killamch89 said:

I spent 6 months in London and took on the accent instinctively and normally I just speak proper english.

It's funny though, I have never been to London but I just adopted it over Time.

Over here the accent is usually separated by where you come or state of origin and you could comfortably differentiate someone from the northern parts to someone from the south or west, but in my case no one can actually tell where I am from by my speech because I don't speak like any of them.

To some extent some people are so cool with it while other think I am way too english in my ways of life and speech.

Edited by Clasher
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9 hours ago, Clasher said:

It's funny though, I have never been to London but I just adopted it over Time.

Over here the accent is usually separated by where you come or state of origin and you could comfortably differentiate someone from the northern parts to someone from the south or west, but in my case no one can actually tell where I am from by my speech because I don't speak like any of them.

To some extent some people are so cool with it while other think I am way too english in my ways of life and speech.

It's better to speak proper English because most people from other English-speaking countries will understand you clearly. On the other hand, the only people from any country that speaks English that I can't fully understand are Scottish people. Between the accent and the slangs they use/ how they pronouce words, you have to ask them to repeat several times. Here's an example and this is better than some of the others I've met in real life.

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14 hours ago, killamch89 said:

It's better to speak proper English because most people from other English-speaking countries will understand you clearly. On the other hand, the only people from any country that speaks English that I can't fully understand are Scottish people. Between the accent and the slangs they use/ how they pronouce words, you have to ask them to repeat several times. Here's an example and this is better than some of the others I've met in real life.

That's true, you have to listen extra attentively to even understand a complete sentence. Lol

We have our distinctive slangs over and if you ain't From the neighborhood or that area you won't understand anything that is been said and most of them aren't even english words.

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On 8/2/2022 at 1:25 PM, killamch89 said:

It's better to speak proper English because most people from other English-speaking countries will understand you clearly. On the other hand, the only people from any country that speaks English that I can't fully understand are Scottish people. Between the accent and the slangs they use/ how they pronouce words, you have to ask them to repeat several times. Here's an example and this is better than some of the others I've met in real life.

 

I'm waiting for @Shagger and @Crazycrab to chime in on this one. I can't wait to hear their thoughts.

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On 7/31/2022 at 2:07 PM, Withywarlock said:

Oh dear, I knew I'd find the phrase "British accent" in here. Never fails to grind my gears. Oh well!

To me it’s funny when I see Brits get salty about that, because the generic response is always “we have several accents!”, yet are adamant about using the term “American accent”.

I can’t tell if they’re being hypocritical by implying America has one accent, or if they’re trying to take a jab at us like “let’s see how you like it!”. Though it’s not that offensive.

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59 minutes ago, Grungie said:

To me it’s funny when I see Brits get salty about that, because the generic response is always “we have several accents!”, yet are adamant about using the term “American accent”.

Indeed, having said that I try not to use the term aMeRiCaN aCcEnT because I try to pay as much common courtesy as I can by showing an interest in the person I'm speaking to.

59 minutes ago, Grungie said:

I can’t tell if they’re being hypocritical by implying America has one accent, or if they’re trying to take a jab at us like “let’s see how you like it!”.

Most of the time it's just damn fool ignorance, and it's not even true that America has one accent.

59 minutes ago, Grungie said:

Though it’s not that offensive.

No, it doesn't offend me either per se, I just like different accents and seeing how different they are despite (in the case of Great Britain) the geographical distances. I suppose others don't share my same fascination.

Edited by Withywarlock
Unnecessary addendum.
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