Jump to content
Register Now
Sign in to follow this  
killamch89

Most Interesting Video Game Protagonist

Recommended Posts

The most interesting video game protagonist for me is Alucard from the Castlevania series. He is the son of the antagonist of the series Dracula - Alucard has all of his father's vampiric powers yet none of his weaknesses because he is only half-vampire. The thing I find interesting is that with all those powers and abilities, he still is unable/unwilling to stop his own father despite being just as powerful. Which Video Game Protagonist do you find interesting and why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neku Sakuraba. The entire plot of The World Ends With You revolves around this kid from Shibuya. The guy just tries to find his way through the perilous position he's in. Often aiding characters like Shiki, Joshua and Beat through their own issues. Of course, he also plays a much bigger role which I definitely am not going to spoil. But overall, Neku is a pretty great guy when you get to know him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/10/2019 at 2:32 AM, UleTheVee said:

Neku Sakuraba. The entire plot of The World Ends With You revolves around this kid from Shibuya. The guy just tries to find his way through the perilous position he's in. Often aiding characters like Shiki, Joshua and Beat through their own issues. Of course, he also plays a much bigger role which I definitely am not going to spoil. But overall, Neku is a pretty great guy when you get to know him.

Sounds very interesting and the fact that him helping certain characters can alter the games story - very interesting indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go with the Virgin and Dante as the characters. I think Virgin is only a  good character in one video game. Otherwise he seems to be antagonist in most of the games. But either way both of them are pretty good and worth watching. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, StaceyPowers said:

Booker DeWitt, but it's hard to explain anything about "why" without massive spoilers for anyone who hasn't played Bioshock Infinite.

Put a spoiler warning before your comment because I am interested to hear about this character since I have never really played Bioshock Infinite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, killamch89 said:

Put a spoiler warning before your comment because I am interested to hear about this character since I have never really played Bioshock Infinite.

 

Okay, MASSIVE SPOILERS FOLLOW.



Booker DeWitt is a fascinating protagonist because it turns out that he's also the game's antagonist, Comstock. His self from a parallel universe is the enemy he is battling through the entire game.

But what makes this particularly interesting is that there is a deep logic to the situation. Booker's past involved him doing some horrible things and being exposed to some terrible situations (incidentally based on real world events). He was deeply traumatized by this, and in the other universe, he coped with the monstrous things he had done by going all out and embracing that monstrosity.

So in a surprisingly literal way, Booker is battling his own psychological and spiritual demons through the game. Through the grace of his daughter and the force of his own will, he makes a choice at the end of the game to erase all possible futures as Comstock. Considering the evil within him was momentous enough to almost destroy the multiverse, the fact that he managed to beat it speaks volumes to his ultimate goodness.
 

Edited by StaceyPowers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, StaceyPowers said:

 

Okay, MASSIVE SPOILERS FOLLOW.



Booker DeWitt is a fascinating protagonist because it turns out that he's also the game's antagonist, Comstock. His self from a parallel universe is the enemy he is battling through the entire game.

But what makes this particularly interesting is that there is a deep logic to the situation. Booker's past involved him doing some horrible things and being exposed to some terrible situations (incidentally based on real world events). He was deeply traumatized by this, and in the other universe, he coped with the monstrous things he had done by going all out and embracing that monstrosity.

So in a surprisingly literal way, Booker is battling his own psychological and spiritual demons through the game. Through the grace of his daughter and the force of his own will, he makes a choice at the end of the game to erase all possible futures as Comstock. Considering the evil within him was momentous enough to almost destroy the multiverse, the fact that he managed to beat it speaks volumes to his ultimate goodness.
 

That is a very valid lesson actually because a lot of times, you really are your own worst enemy. When you need to get something done but you feel too lazy to do it and you literally have to fight yourself to get it done. Or when you are doing something challenging and you suddenly start to doubt yourself which stops you from doing your best. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, killamch89 said:

That is a very valid lesson actually because a lot of times, you really are your own worst enemy. When you need to get something done but you feel too lazy to do it and you literally have to fight yourself to get it done. Or when you are doing something challenging and you suddenly start to doubt yourself which stops you from doing your best. 

That's true. What I found interesting is that in Booker's case, the same traits (his revulsion at the evils of the world and his part in them) that drove him toward damnation in one world were also essential to his salvation in the other. It was just a question of how they were directed. Anyway, the game has a lot to say about free will, free choice (not necessarily identical), and some comments on Christianity that I found interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, StaceyPowers said:

That's true. What I found interesting is that in Booker's case, the same traits (his revulsion at the evils of the world and his part in them) that drove him toward damnation in one world were also essential to his salvation in the other. It was just a question of how they were directed. Anyway, the game has a lot to say about free will, free choice (not necessarily identical), and some comments on Christianity that I found interesting.

Even your so-called "evil" traits have a purpose in particular situations but as you say it is how you use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...