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Empire

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  1. Like
    Empire got a reaction from Katri Marcell in Do you think Mobile gaming will die?   
    Yes and no.
    No, in that it’s making plenty of money, there’s plenty of developers, and plenty of new games coming out.
    Yes, however, there’s a super-saturation of developers jumping on the bandwagon. While there’s more money in total, it’s being stretched pretty thin so that even devs with great games are basically being pushed out of the market just due to the sheer volume being produced.
    This is probably not a long term “death” by any means, though. We’ll probably see a die-off of a bunch of smaller companies and single-dev indie startups when it becomes impossible to ignore the fact that most of them won’t make any profits and it’s not the cash cow they seem to think it’ll be.
    When that happens, you’ll see a correction on its own where the more competent developers are able to take advantage of the situation.
    Things like candy crush and other such games, however, are not going to go away unless they’re made illegal. They’re specifically designed to make abusive use of the very tiny portion of the population with severe gambling addictions and so on. Less than 1% of their player base makes up for over 90% of their profits, and when you consider that some of them are making millions per month, that should become suddenly very worrying when you realize what that means the average person in that 1% range is paying out.
    Basically, regulation of harmful games which are designed explicitly to milk a very small amount of addictive personality customers for unhealthy amounts, will wind up killing that portion of the market off, which would mean fewer devs expecting to be the next big thing, and the market itself would decrease drastically in scale of production… but it would be higher quality games on average.
    As it is, it will have a “small” death in that the more people that enter the market, the less sustainable it will be for most of them and you’ll see a crash similar to what happened back in the dot-com crash in the 90’s. It won’t kill off everything by any means, but it’ll change the way the games are made substantially.
  2. Like
    Empire got a reaction from StaceyPowers in First Person vs. Third Person   
    I much prefer first person perspective. I feel less immersed with the character and story if I am floating observer of the action rather than a participant. (There are some exceptions to this though - playing as Batman works better when you are constantly reminded of the awesome guy you are playing.)
    I also get irritated when I have to constantly peer past my character when trying to see the environment, either for the practical needs of playing the game (seeing what I am shooting at) or the aesthetic factors of being able to appreciate the view. The game Papo and Yo was an example of the latter; it had a dynamic FOV that would zoom into your character's back when you stopped to enjoy the lovely scenery. It was very irritating.
    It annoys me when I can't look up at where I need to go except at the moment the game decides to take camera control away from me to show me something.
    I also dislike having to control my camera. In first person, the camera is linked to where you are aiming and where you are going unless you strafe (which 99.9% of the time is what you want). In third person mode (and especially with a controller), the camera becomes yet another thing that you have to fight against; constantly having to adjust it to keep what you want to see in frame. I imagine people coming from consoles are so used to this that they don't notice any more, but as someone who grew up on the PC with Doom & Quake this is something that always seems to get in my way.
    The benefits of third person view is that it better simulates peripheral vision (although it goes too far and shows you behind you too). It also makes up for the lack of awareness of your body, although games like the Thief series and Mirror's Edge show that you can still get away without this. It is also better for those games that zoom back quite a way when a more tactical view is required, but I consider that not so much a third person view as a strategic view.
  3. Like
    Empire got a reaction from Cabrelle in Do you think Mobile gaming will die?   
    Yes and no.
    No, in that it’s making plenty of money, there’s plenty of developers, and plenty of new games coming out.
    Yes, however, there’s a super-saturation of developers jumping on the bandwagon. While there’s more money in total, it’s being stretched pretty thin so that even devs with great games are basically being pushed out of the market just due to the sheer volume being produced.
    This is probably not a long term “death” by any means, though. We’ll probably see a die-off of a bunch of smaller companies and single-dev indie startups when it becomes impossible to ignore the fact that most of them won’t make any profits and it’s not the cash cow they seem to think it’ll be.
    When that happens, you’ll see a correction on its own where the more competent developers are able to take advantage of the situation.
    Things like candy crush and other such games, however, are not going to go away unless they’re made illegal. They’re specifically designed to make abusive use of the very tiny portion of the population with severe gambling addictions and so on. Less than 1% of their player base makes up for over 90% of their profits, and when you consider that some of them are making millions per month, that should become suddenly very worrying when you realize what that means the average person in that 1% range is paying out.
    Basically, regulation of harmful games which are designed explicitly to milk a very small amount of addictive personality customers for unhealthy amounts, will wind up killing that portion of the market off, which would mean fewer devs expecting to be the next big thing, and the market itself would decrease drastically in scale of production… but it would be higher quality games on average.
    As it is, it will have a “small” death in that the more people that enter the market, the less sustainable it will be for most of them and you’ll see a crash similar to what happened back in the dot-com crash in the 90’s. It won’t kill off everything by any means, but it’ll change the way the games are made substantially.
  4. Like
    Empire got a reaction from Jayson in Using a Gaming PC for Art   
    It can be done, I mean I would use an work station card rather then a day to day card. But if you have an good amount of specs then it's easy done said. Depends on what art you want to do?
  5. Like
    Empire got a reaction from Aimee Hart in How big is your backlog?   
    I don't say that I have an very big back-log. I have like 90 games on my steam account. But that's nothing to some others out there that has over 1K of games. And yet I only played like 20% of the games that is listed in my account. Half the time I stick with the same games you know lol
  6. Like
    Empire got a reaction from DC in Empire is here!   
    Hello all and I'm empire who is known to me empire on most places. So I'm new to the site but not new to the IPB software. IPB is my number one that I always like. So I born in Australia living in the UK 🙂 
    So How is everyone going? 
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